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"The CDF W-Mass Measurement "


Ashutosh Kotwal , Duke University
[Host: Craig Group]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

High Energy Physics Seminar
Thursday, October 13, 2022
3:30 PM
Chemistry Building, Room 206
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"COHERENT (TBC)"


Tyler Johnson , Duke University
[Host: Craig Group]
High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, October 5, 2022
4:00 PM
Chemistry Building, Room 206

Join Zoom Meeting: 
https://virginia.zoom.us/j/92287909487
Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487   Passcode: HEPseminar


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"First Results from the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) Experiment"


Kelly Stifter , Fermilab
[Host: Matt Solt]
ABSTRACT:

The nature and origin of dark matter are among the most compelling mysteries of contemporary science. LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) is a dark matter direct detection experiment located at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The experiment consists of a dual-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber with an active volume of 7 tonnes, surrounded by an active liquid xenon skin region and a gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator neutron detector. With an exposure of 60 live days using a fiducial mass of 5.5 tonnes, LZ has achieved world-leading sensitivity to Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). This talk will give an overview of the LZ experiment and present results from LZ's first dark matter search.

High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, September 21, 2022
4:00 PM
Chemistry Building, Room 206

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https://virginia.zoom.us/j/92287909487
Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487   Passcode: HEPseminar


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"The interplay between measurement and disorder in measurement induced chiral transport"


Brian Khor , University of Virginia - Department of Physics
ABSTRACT:

In quantum many-body systems, measurement tends to kill quantum entanglement and correlations between different degrees of freedom. Nonetheless, recent developments have explored how measurement can be used to engineer new non-equilibrium phases of matter, but mostly in the context of quantum entanglement in random quantum circuits. In this talk, I will first take a different perspective and first examine how a protocol of repeated, periodic measurements can be used to generate chiral transport in a system of free fermions [1], mimicking the anomalous Floquet topological insulators [2]. We will then examine the effects of different types of realistic disorder, namely site blockade, lattice distortions, and random onsite potential on this measurement induced chiral transport. Most notably, one observes a percolation phase transition in the flow of measurement induced chirality with percolation threshold matching previous result on the percolation cluster in a Lieb lattice [3]. Our work demonstrates how measurements can be used to engineer new states of matter, and I will point out future directions on the fundamental role of measurements in the dynamics of quantum many-body systems.

References:

[1] "Stirring by staring: Measurement induced Chirality", arXiv:2108.05906

[2] "Anomalous Edge States and the Bulk-Edge Correspondence for Periodically Driven Two-Dimensional Systems", PRX 3, 031005 (2013).

[3] "Percolation on Lieb Lattices", PRE 104, 064122 (2021).

High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, May 4, 2022
4:00 PM
Zoom and in-person, Room 313
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Meeting ID: 265 739 0511 Password: Bosonize


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"Testing Lorentz and CPT violation in the quark sector at colliders"


Enrico Lunghi , Indiana University
[Host: Robert Hirosky]
ABSTRACT:

Tests of Lorentz invariance continue to inform and challenge our modern understanding of spacetime symmetries. Using a model-independent framework based on effective field theory, generic deviations from exact Lorentz and CPT invariance can be studied in a wide class of physical systems. Despite the large number of constraints extracted over the past two decades, stringent limits on many quark-sector effects remain relatively scarce. I discuss the sensitivity of dedicated searches at electron-proton and proton-proton colliders.

High Energy Physics Seminar
Tuesday, May 3, 2022
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
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Note special time.
Note special room.

Attend via Zoom:

https://virginia.zoom.us/j/97596141036?pwd=ZmxFTytZb252Qmk0RlFaZHJlczdzQT09


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"The MoEDAL-MAPP Experiment at the LHC – Where Do We Come From? Where Are We Now? Where Are We Going?"


Professor James Pinfold , University of Alberta
[Host: Prof. PQ Hung]
ABSTRACT:

The MoEDAL experiment deployed at IP8 on the LHC ring was the first dedicated search experiment to take data at the LHC in 2010.  It was designed to search for Highly Ionizing Particle (HIP) avatars of new physics such as magnetic monopoles, dyons, Q-balls, multiply charged particles, massive slowly moving charged particles and long-lived massive charge SUSY particles. We shall report on our search at LHC’s Run-2 for Magnetic monopoles and dyons produced in p-p and photon-fusion. We will report in a little more detail our most recent result in this arena:  the search for magnetic monopoles via the Schwinger Mechanism in Pb-Pb collisions, that was recently published in Nature.

            The MoEDAL detector will be reinstalled for LHC’s Run-3 to continue the search for electrically and magnetically charged HIPs. As part of this effort we will initiate the search for massive long-very lived SUSY particles to which MoEDAL has a competitive sensitivity.   An upgrade to MoEDAL, the MoEDAL Apparatus for Penetrating Particles (MAPP), approved by CERN’s Research Board is now the LHC’s newest detector. The MAPP detector, positioned in UA83, expands the physics reach of MoEDAL to include sensitivity to feebly-charged particles with charge, or effective charge, as low as 10-3 e (where e is the electron charge). Also, the MAPP detector In conjunction with MoEDAL’s trapping detector gives us a unique sensitivity to extremely long-lived charged particles. MAPP also has some sensitivity to long-lived neutral particles.

            Additionally, we will briefly report on the plans for the MAPP-2 upgrade to the MoEDAL-MAPP experiment for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). We envisage that this detector will be deployed in the UGC1 gallery near to IP8. This phase of the experiment is designed to maximize  MoEDAL-MAPP’s sensitivity to very long-lived neutral messengers of physics beyond the Standard Model.

High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, April 20, 2022
4:00 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
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Join Zoom Meeting: 
https://virginia.zoom.us/j/92287909487
Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487
Password: HEPseminar


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"Data-Driven cross checks for electron neutrino selection efficiency in NOvA"


Anna Hall , University of Virginia - Department of Physics
[Host: Prof. Craig Group]
ABSTRACT:

NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, designed to make measurements using muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance. It consists of two functionally equivalent detectors and utilizes the Fermilab NuMI beam. NOvA uses a convolutional neural network for particle identification of electron neutrino events with a validation process that includes several data-driven techniques. In particular, a suite of studies called the Muon Removed studies checks for bias in our particle identifier between simulation and data arising from potential mismodelling in our simulation by modifying samples of muonic events to create samples of pure electron neutrino like events. This talk will discuss the implementation and results of these techniques being applied to our most recent analysis as well as how these cross checks could be extended to corrections to our predicted electron neutrino signal.

High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, April 13, 2022
4:00 PM
Physics Building, Room 313
Note special room.

Join Zoom Meeting: 
virginia.zoom.us/j/92287909487?pwd=NjkwWlFFSnRYblJmUWVEZDZ5RU11QT09
Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487
Password: HEPseminar


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"Looking forward to exciting physics with FASER"


Felix Kling , Stanford University
[Host: Craig Dukes]
ABSTRACT:

Physics searches and measurements at high-energy collider experiments traditionally focus on the high-pT region. However, if particles are light and weakly-coupled, this focus may be completely misguided: light particles are typically highly collimated around the beam line, allowing sensitive searches with small detectors, and even extremely weakly-coupled particles may be produced in large numbers there. The FASER experiment will use the opportunity and extend the LHC’s physic potential by searching for long-lived particles and study-

ing neutrino interactions at TeV energies. In this talk, I will present the physics potential of FASER for new physics searches, neutrino physics and QCD and astro-particle physics.

 

VIDEO:
High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, April 6, 2022
4:00 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
Note special room.

Attend via Zoom: 
https://virginia.zoom.us/j/92287909487
Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487  Passcode: HEPseminar


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"The search for new physics with rare kaon decays at the CERN SPS"


Matthew Moulson , INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati
[Host: Prof. Craig Dukes]
ABSTRACT:

Abstract attached. 

VIDEO:
High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, March 23, 2022
4:00 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
Note special room.

Attend via Zoom: 
https://virginia.zoom.us/j/92287909487
Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487  Passcode: HEPseminar


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"An introduction to decomposition"


Professor Eric Sharpe , Virginia Tech
[Host: Prof. Diana Vaman]
ABSTRACT:

In this talk I will review work on `decomposition,' a property of 2d theories with 1-form symmetries and, more generally, d-dim'l theories with (d-1)-form symmetries.  Decomposition is the observation that such quantum field theories are equivalent to ('decompose into’) disjoint unions of other QFTs, known in this context as "universes.” Examples include two-dimensional gauge theories and orbifolds with matter invariant under a subgroup of the gauge group. 

Decomposition explains and relates several physical properties of these theories -- for example, restrictions on allowed instantons arise as a "multiverse interference effect" between contributions from constituent universes. First worked out in 2006 as part of efforts to understand string propagation on generalizations of spaces,  decomposition has been the driver of a number of developments since. 

In the first half of this talk, I will review decomposition; in the second half, I will focus on the recent application to anomaly resolution of Wang-Wen-Witten in two-dimensional finite gauge theories known as orbifolds.

High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, March 9, 2022
3:30 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
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Note special room.

Join Zoom Meeting: https://virginia.zoom.us/j/4644923928


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"MicroBooNE's First Results: Addressing a 5sigma Anomaly with a Precision Detector"


Professor Joshua Spitz , University of Michigan
[Host: Prof. Craig Dukes]
ABSTRACT:

I will present the first oscillation-related results from the MicroBooNE neutrino experiment at Fermilab. These measurements, featuring extensive searches for anomalous rates of both electron neutrinos and neutrino-induced gammas from the Booster Neutrino Beamline with multiple final-state topologies, directly address the 4.8sigma excess of electron-like events seen by the MiniBooNE experiment.
 

VIDEO:
High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, March 2, 2022
4:00 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
Note special room.

Join via Zoom: 
https://virginia.zoom.us/j/92287909487
Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487  Passcode: HEPseminar


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"The CUORE experiment: results and perspectives"


Irene Nutini , Università Milano Bicocca - Dip. Fisica
[Host: Craig Dukes]
ABSTRACT:

The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE), hosted at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy, is the first one-tonne scale cryogenic experiment searching for neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay of 130Te. The discovery of this process would demonstrate that lepton number is not a symmetry of nature and that neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. The CUORE experiment has also the potential for the search for rare events and/or for physics beyond the Standard Model other than the 0νββ decay. CUORE is currently in stable operating mode, an exposure of more than 1 tonne∙yr has been achieved and the data taking is currently underway to collect 5 years of run time. In this talk, the current results of CUORE's main analyses will be presented, as well as a review of the detector performance and the analysis techniques. The seminar conclusion will provide an insight on the future perspectives of 0vββ decay searches utilising cryogenic calorimeters, mainly the CUPID experiment.

VIDEO:
High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, January 26, 2022
4:00 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
Note special room.

Join Zoom Meeting: 
https://virginia.zoom.us/j/92287909487
Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487
Password: HEPseminar


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"HEP and Future Jet Substructure Measurements"


Dr. Christine McLean , SUNY-Buffalo
[Host: Chris Neu]
ABSTRACT:

Since the discovery of the SM Higgs boson in 2012, the investigation of the apparent difference between the electroweak and Planck scales has led to more interest in collisions with energies above the electroweak scale. One consequence of this new regime is expanded interest in hadronic final states resulting in collimated sprays of particles called jets. Understanding jets and jet substructure has therefore become of vital interest to particle physicists. In this seminar, I present recent measurements of jet substructure quantities, which can help us better understand multijet systems and to improve machine learning taggers by reducing systematic uncertainties. I also detail my work on jet reconstruction and plans to understand jet substructure at future colliders.

VIDEO:
High Energy Physics Seminar
Wednesday, December 8, 2021
4:00 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
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Join Zoom Meeting: 
https://virginia.zoom.us/j/92287909487
Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487
Password: HEPseminar


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"Programming languages, toolkits, and communities in particle physics data analysis "


Dr. Jim Pivarski , Princeton University
[Host: John Hakala]
ABSTRACT:

Experimental particle physics is an intensely computational field of science. In fact, particle physicists were arguably the first non-secret (non-cryptography) users of digital computers, and have been pushing the boundaries of pattern recognition and throughput ever since. For decades, our unique needs justified custom software at all levels of the stack, maintained "in-house" by physicists, but the situation changed in the 21st century. Machine learning and analysis of web-scale datasets (i.e. "Big Data") has become an industry on its own, under the catch-all name "data science." Physicists are responding by adopting data science toolsets and methodologies, integrating them with traditional physics software, though the process is ongoing and differs in degree across physics groups. 

This talk will present a big picture of how experimental particle physicists have used data analysis software in the past 75 years, how our needs have dictated a choice of programming languages and toolkits, and how those choices are changing. We'll see how pattern recognition evolved from semi-automated to algorithmic to machine learning, how programming languages transitioned from Fortran to C++ to include a significant mix of Python, and how software was organized from site-custom solutions to standard packages like CERNLIB and ROOT to also include a mix of data science tools. Finally, these choices are not purely technical: communities form around software tools, and integrating toolsets integrates physicists with the larger world.

VIDEO:
High Energy Physics Seminar
Monday, December 6, 2021
4:00 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
Note special date.
Note special room.

Special Seminar
 
Join Zoom Meeting:    https://virginia.zoom.us/j/94905079229
Meeting ID: 949 0507 9229  Passcode: HEPseminar


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To add a speaker, send an email to ecd3m@Virginia.EDU Include the seminar type (e.g. High Energy Physics Seminars), date, name of the speaker, title of talk, and an abstract (if available). [Please send a copy of the email to phys-speakers@Virginia.EDU.]