×

"Available"


Available
ABSTRACT:

available

Colloquium
Friday, August 26, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

 Add to your calendar

"Atom Interferometry on Earth and in Space"


Cass Sackett , UVA - Department of Physics
[Host: Despina Louca]
ABSTRACT:

Atom interferometers are a type of quantum sensor useful for navigation, geographics, and tests of fundamental physics. We report on recent progress in three areas: a trapped-atom Sagnac interferometer for rotation sensing, the use of atom interferometry to measure "tune-out wavelengths," and a demonstration of atom interferometry in the Cold Atom Laboratory on the ISS. These efforts are representative of the types of efforts begin pursued in the field, including pushing towards practical applications, pursuing basic science, and technology demonstrations to support future applications and science.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Friday, September 2, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


 Add to your calendar

"Pursuit of Equity and Excellence in the APS Division of Nuclear Physics"


Warren Rogers , Indiana Wesleyan University
[Host: Simonetta Liuti]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, September 9, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

Zoom Link: https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp

 


 Add to your calendar

"Gravitational Waves as a Probe of Fundamental Physics and Astrophysics"


Kent Yagi , UVA-Department of Physics
[Host: Despina Louca]
ABSTRACT:

Recent observations of black holes and neutron stars through gravitational waves allow us to explore the novel strong-gravity and extreme-density regime. In this talk, I will explain how we can use gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers to probe gravitational physics and those from binary neutron star mergers to study nuclear physics. For the former, I will focus on a theory beyond General Relativity motivated by string theory while for the latter, I will investigate the presence of solid quark cores inside neutron stars. I will also comment on how we can use gravitational waves from binary white dwarfs, expected to be detected with future space-based detectors, to learn astrophysics.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Friday, September 16, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


 Add to your calendar

"What is hiding beyond the Standard Model?"


Craig Group , UVA - Department of Physics
[Host: Despina Louca]
ABSTRACT:

During the last century, particle physicists have formulated and tested a “Standard Model” of fundamental particle physics.  This model has been extremely valuable in successfully making precise predictions for thousands of experiments.  Still, physicists know this model is incomplete!  For example, through many astrophysical observations, we know that the source of a large fraction of the energy in the Universe is due to particles and forces beyond what is included in the Standard Model.  This is a pretty big missing piece, but there is more!  We also don’t understand the structure of the Standard Model, or the reason we observe a matter-dominated Universe – why not antimatter?  These mysteries (and others) mean that there is certainly “New Physics” waiting to be discovered if we do the right experiments!  Where is the New Physics hiding?  We don’t know.  I’ll review several ongoing experimental efforts aimed at answering some of these big fundamental mysteries.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Friday, September 23, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


 Add to your calendar

"Available"


Available
ABSTRACT:

available

Colloquium
Friday, September 30, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

 Add to your calendar

"Enhanced associative memory, classification and learning with active dynamics"


Suri Vaikuntanathan , University of Chicago
[Host: Marija Vucelja ]
ABSTRACT:

Motivated by advances in the field of active matter where non-equilibrium forcing has been shown to activate new assembly pathways, here we study how  non-equilibrium driving in prototypical   memory formation models  can affect their information processing capabilities. Our results reveal that activity can provide a new and surprisingly general way to dramatically improve the memory and information processing performance of the above described systems without the need for additional interactions or changes in connectivity. Non-equilibrium dynamics can allow these systems to have memory capacity, assembly or pattern recognition properties, and learning ability, in excess of their corresponding equilibrium counterparts. Counter-intuitively, in some cases, dynamics with non-equilibrium noise-sources can even have a higher memory capacity than  zero temperature equilibrium systems that are not subject to any noise.  Our results demonstrate the  generality of the enhancement of memory capacity arising from non-equilibrium, active dynamics. These results are of significance to a variety of processes that take place under nonequilibrium dynamics, and involve information storage and retrieval, as well as in silico learning and memory forming systems for which nonequilibrium dynamics may provide an approach for modulating memory formation.

Colloquium
Friday, October 7, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


 Add to your calendar

"The Heavyweight W boson - an Upset to the Standard Model of Particle Physics"


Ashutosh Kotwal , Duke University
[Host: Craig Group]
ABSTRACT:

The Standard Model of particle physics has been a crowning achievement of fundamental physics, culminating in the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. As a quantum theory of the building blocks of matter and forces, it has been one of the most successful theories in science. The recent measurement of the mass of the W boson disagrees with the theory prediction. This upset to the Standard Model may point towards exciting new discoveries in particle physics in the coming years. We will discuss the Standard Model, the crucial role of the W boson, and how it has become the harbinger of new laws of nature.

Colloquium
Friday, October 14, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


 Add to your calendar

"Available"


Available
ABSTRACT:

available

Colloquium
Friday, October 21, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

 Add to your calendar

"Available"


Available
ABSTRACT:

Available

Colloquium
Friday, October 28, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

 Add to your calendar

"Available"


Available
ABSTRACT:

Available

Colloquium
Friday, November 4, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

 Add to your calendar

"You have your physics results. Now what?"


Sami Mitra , PRL
[Host: Avik Ghosh]
ABSTRACT:

In a talk that I am hoping will quickly morph into a free-flowing Q and A session, I will discuss the roles of journals in general and PRL in particular in disseminating physics results through a cascading sequence involving journal editors, referees, conference chairs, journalists, department chairs, deans, funding agencies, and others. While some of the essential tools of physics dissemination are unchanged, the arrival of social media, search engines, and electronic repositories have us in a state of flux.

Colloquium
Friday, November 11, 2022
2:00 PM
Thornton, Room 303
Note special time.
Note special room.

Zoom link: https://virginia.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_uqZ5UhGCR76tfb9PUa101A


 Add to your calendar

Available
ABSTRACT:

Available

Colloquium
Friday, November 11, 2022
2:00 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special time.
Note special room.

 Add to your calendar

"Available"


Available
ABSTRACT:

available

Colloquium
Friday, November 18, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

 Add to your calendar

"To the Standard Models and beyond with beta decay"


Leendert Hayen , NCSU
[Host: Stefan Baessler]
ABSTRACT:

While the Standard Model of particle physics is one of the most successful constructed theories in history, several questions remain unanswered, such as the nature of dark matter, the neutrino mass mechanism, the matter-antimatter asymmetry and elemental abundance in the universe. All of these are intimately intertwined with the electroweak interaction responsible for free neutron and nuclear beta decays, making them an ideal laboratory for precision studies to unearth hidden features of Beyond Standard Models physics. In this talk, I will present a brief overview of recent theoretical and experimental progress in this vibrant field, sketch the impact and status of the Nab experiment and show how quantum sensing technology can open up a promising new direction. 

Colloquium
Friday, December 2, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

 Add to your calendar

To add a speaker, send an email to dn2ep@Virginia.EDU Include the seminar type (e.g. Colloquia), date, name of the speaker, title of talk, and an abstract (if available). [Please send a copy of the email to phys-speakers@Virginia.EDU.]