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"TBA"


Emanuele Berti , Johns Hopkins University
[Host: David Nichols]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, April 28, 2023
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

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"TBA"


Professor Katherine Freese , University of Texas, Austin
[Host: Prof. PQ Hung]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, April 21, 2023
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

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"TBA"


Christopher Jarzynski , University of Maryland
[Host: Marija Vucelja]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, March 31, 2023
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

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"TBA"


Prof. Yaroslav Tserkovnyak , UCLA
[Host: Prof. Israel Klich]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, March 24, 2023
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

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"TBA"


Josh Ruderman , NYU
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, March 3, 2023
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

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"TBA"


TBA
[Host: Stefan Baessler]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, February 17, 2023
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

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"TBA"


Andrea Liu , University of Pennsylvania
[Host: Marija Vucelja]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, February 3, 2023
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

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"TBA"


Julian Heeck , UVA-High Energy Physics
[Host: Despina Louca]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, January 27, 2023
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

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"TBA"


David Dean
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, January 20, 2023
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

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"To the Standard Models and beyond with beta decay"


Leendert Hayen , NCSU
[Host: Stefan Baessler]
ABSTRACT:

While the Standard Model of particle physics is one of the most successful constructed theories in history, several questions remain unanswered, such as the nature of dark matter, the neutrino mass mechanism, the matter-antimatter asymmetry and elemental abundance in the universe. All of these are intimately intertwined with the electroweak interaction responsible for free neutron and nuclear beta decays, making them an ideal laboratory for precision studies to unearth hidden features of Beyond Standard Models physics. In this talk, I will present a brief overview of recent theoretical and experimental progress in this vibrant field, sketch the impact and status of the Nab experiment and show how quantum sensing technology can open up a promising new direction. 

Colloquium
Friday, December 2, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

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"You have your physics results. Now what?"


Sami Mitra , PRL
[Host: Avik Ghosh]
ABSTRACT:

In a talk that I am hoping will quickly morph into a free-flowing Q and A session, I will discuss the roles of journals in general and PRL in particular in disseminating physics results through a cascading sequence involving journal editors, referees, conference chairs, journalists, department chairs, deans, funding agencies, and others. While some of the essential tools of physics dissemination are unchanged, the arrival of social media, search engines, and electronic repositories have us in a state of flux.

Colloquium
Friday, November 11, 2022
2:00 PM
Thornton, Room 303
Note special time.
Note special room.

Zoom link: https://virginia.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_uqZ5UhGCR76tfb9PUa101A


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"The Heavyweight W boson - an Upset to the Standard Model of Particle Physics"


Ashutosh Kotwal , Duke University
[Host: Craig Group]
ABSTRACT:

The Standard Model of particle physics has been a crowning achievement of fundamental physics, culminating in the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. As a quantum theory of the building blocks of matter and forces, it has been one of the most successful theories in science. The recent measurement of the mass of the W boson disagrees with the theory prediction. This upset to the Standard Model may point towards exciting new discoveries in particle physics in the coming years. We will discuss the Standard Model, the crucial role of the W boson, and how it has become the harbinger of new laws of nature.

Colloquium
Friday, October 14, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"Enhanced associative memory, classification and learning with active dynamics"


Suri Vaikuntanathan , University of Chicago
[Host: Marija Vucelja ]
ABSTRACT:

Motivated by advances in the field of active matter where non-equilibrium forcing has been shown to activate new assembly pathways, here we study how  non-equilibrium driving in prototypical   memory formation models  can affect their information processing capabilities. Our results reveal that activity can provide a new and surprisingly general way to dramatically improve the memory and information processing performance of the above described systems without the need for additional interactions or changes in connectivity. Non-equilibrium dynamics can allow these systems to have memory capacity, assembly or pattern recognition properties, and learning ability, in excess of their corresponding equilibrium counterparts. Counter-intuitively, in some cases, dynamics with non-equilibrium noise-sources can even have a higher memory capacity than  zero temperature equilibrium systems that are not subject to any noise.  Our results demonstrate the  generality of the enhancement of memory capacity arising from non-equilibrium, active dynamics. These results are of significance to a variety of processes that take place under nonequilibrium dynamics, and involve information storage and retrieval, as well as in silico learning and memory forming systems for which nonequilibrium dynamics may provide an approach for modulating memory formation.

Colloquium
Friday, October 7, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"What is hiding beyond the Standard Model?"


Craig Group , UVA - Department of Physics
[Host: Despina Louca]
ABSTRACT:

During the last century, particle physicists have formulated and tested a “Standard Model” of fundamental particle physics.  This model has been extremely valuable in successfully making precise predictions for thousands of experiments.  Still, physicists know this model is incomplete!  For example, through many astrophysical observations, we know that the source of a large fraction of the energy in the Universe is due to particles and forces beyond what is included in the Standard Model.  This is a pretty big missing piece, but there is more!  We also don’t understand the structure of the Standard Model, or the reason we observe a matter-dominated Universe – why not antimatter?  These mysteries (and others) mean that there is certainly “New Physics” waiting to be discovered if we do the right experiments!  Where is the New Physics hiding?  We don’t know.  I’ll review several ongoing experimental efforts aimed at answering some of these big fundamental mysteries.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Friday, September 23, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"Gravitational Waves as a Probe of Fundamental Physics and Astrophysics"


Kent Yagi , UVA-Department of Physics
[Host: Despina Louca]
ABSTRACT:

Recent observations of black holes and neutron stars through gravitational waves allow us to explore the novel strong-gravity and extreme-density regime. In this talk, I will explain how we can use gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers to probe gravitational physics and those from binary neutron star mergers to study nuclear physics. For the former, I will focus on a theory beyond General Relativity motivated by string theory while for the latter, I will investigate the presence of solid quark cores inside neutron stars. I will also comment on how we can use gravitational waves from binary white dwarfs, expected to be detected with future space-based detectors, to learn astrophysics.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Friday, September 16, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"Pursuit of Equity and Excellence in the APS Division of Nuclear Physics"


Warren Rogers , Indiana Wesleyan University
[Host: Simonetta Liuti]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, September 9, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

Zoom Link: https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp

 


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"Atom Interferometry on Earth and in Space"


Cass Sackett , UVA - Department of Physics
[Host: Despina Louca]
ABSTRACT:

Atom interferometers are a type of quantum sensor useful for navigation, geographics, and tests of fundamental physics. We report on recent progress in three areas: a trapped-atom Sagnac interferometer for rotation sensing, the use of atom interferometry to measure "tune-out wavelengths," and a demonstration of atom interferometry in the Cold Atom Laboratory on the ISS. These efforts are representative of the types of efforts begin pursued in the field, including pushing towards practical applications, pursuing basic science, and technology demonstrations to support future applications and science.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Friday, September 2, 2022
3:30 PM
Clark Hall, Room 108
Note special room.

https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"Re-inventing fixed-target experiments to probe light dark matter"


Cristina Mantilla , Fermilab
[Host: Dustin Keller]
ABSTRACT:

The search for dark matter is ever-evolving and a number of experiments are underway to search for the constituents of dark matter across a vast range of masses. A largely unexplored regime is that where light dark matter particles, with masses between the electron and proton masses, may interact feebly with ordinary matter. I will discuss how small accelerator experiments can produce these dark matter candidates by scattering energetic particles on a fixed target. I will focus on the DarkQuest experiment at Fermilab that uses a proton beam and builds off of an existing detector and accelerator infrastructure. I will also describe how an electron beam can be complimentary used in the Light Dark Matter experiment (LDMX) at SLAC. I will explain the design and challenges of these experiments and their prospects for characterizing a dark matter signal in the near future.

Colloquium
Friday, April 29, 2022
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

Attend virtually via Zoom: 
https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"Probing the Universe with Gravitational Waves"


Barry C. Barish , Professor of Physics, Emeritus, at Caltech, and Distinguished Professor of Physics, at UC Riverside, Nobel Laureate 2017
[Host: Emeritus Professor Brad Cox]
ABSTRACT:

The discovery of gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein in 1916, is enabling both important tests of the theory of general relativity, and represents the birth of a new astronomy. Modern astronomy, using all types of electromagnetic radiation, has giving us an amazing understanding of the complexities of the universe, and how it has evolved. Now, gravitational waves and neutrinos are beginning to provide the opportunity to pursue some of the same astrophysical phenomena in very different ways, as well as to observe phenomena that cannot be studied with electromagnetic radiation. The detection of gravitational waves and the emergence and prospects for this exciting new science will be explored.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Monday, April 25, 2022
7:00 PM
Newcomb Hall, Room Newcomb Hall Theater
Note special date.
Note special time.
Note special room.

Hoxton Lecture


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"The expansion of space, a scaling symmetry, and a mirror-world dark sector"


Professor Lloyd Knox , UC Davis
[Host: Prof. Genya Kolomeisky]
ABSTRACT:

I will introduce, for those unfamiliar with general relativity, the notion of the expansion of space, before going on to discuss a 5 sigma discrepancy between two inferences of the rate of that expansion today. One of those inferences is highly indirect and model dependent, relying on measurements of maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), a thermal relic of the hot big bang. I will explain what the CMB is, and show how well our standard cosmological model describes its statistical properties, and how we can use that model to infer the expansion rate today. I will then describe a symmetry under a scaling transformation of all relevant time scales in the problem that can potentially be exploited to reconcile the two inferences. Significant constraints on such a solution come from measurements of the CMB energy density and the abundances of light elements produced in the big bang. The former constraint can be circumvented by use of a ‘mirror world’ dark sector — a copy of the standard model of particle physics with little to no interactions with standard model particles other than via gravity.

Colloquium
Friday, April 22, 2022
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

Joint Physics-Astronomy colloquium

Attend virtually via Zoom:   https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"Electron spin resonance spectroscopy of quantum spin liquids"


Oleg Starykh , The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
[Host: Prof. Dima Pesin]
ABSTRACT:

Much of the current research in quantum magnetism is motivated by the search for an elusive quantum spin liquid (QSL) state of the magnetic matter. A salient feature of this entangled quantum state is the presence of fractionalized elementary excitations such as spin-1/2 spinons, interactions between which are mediated by the emergent gauge field. 

In my talk, I provide a historical perspective on quantum spin liquids and shed some light on the origins of  this ``weird” idea. Following a brief summary of the current state of affairs in QSL research, I describe  how QSLs respond to the magnetic field and demonstrate surprising similarity of the described response to that of neutral Fermi liquids.

I illustrate these theoretical ideas with a recent electron spin resonance measurements on quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnet K2CuSO4Br2. The experiment leads the first-ever spectroscopic determination of the (backscattering) interaction between spinon excitations of the quantum spin chain.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Friday, April 8, 2022
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

Attend virtually via Zoom: 
https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"How to Become a More Effective Mentor/Mentee"


Kirsten Tollefson , Professor and Associate Dean, Graduate School, at Michigan State University
[Host: Prof. Craig Group]
ABSTRACT:

I will discuss what recent research says about the science of effective mentorship and how we can learn to do it better. We will focus on 2 competencies - aligning expectations and maintaining effective communication - through some guided activities. I will give you examples of strategies and resources that can help you become a more effective mentor and mentee.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Friday, April 1, 2022
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

Attend virtually via Zoom: 
https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"A Career Outside the Academia: My Experiences as VP at a small Hi Tech Company"


Dr. Zuyu Zhao , Janis ULT Inc.
[Host: Prof. Bellave Shivaram]
ABSTRACT:

Most of the physics students will work in industry instead of academia after they got the degree (BSc., MS, or Ph.D.)

The speaker will share his personal 30 year experience of working in a small tech company after his post-doc period, including changes and challenges of culture, daily life, responsibilities, etc.

Advice will be discussed with the audience how meet the challenges.

The speaker’s main tasks were to develop ultra-low temperature facilities from 300mK to 10mK. Along with the speaker’s career growth, examples of his achievements are presented.

A brief business summary of the speaker’s company, before and after COVID, is presented at the end of the presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

Colloquium
Friday, February 25, 2022
3:30 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
Note special room.

Attend virtually via Zoom: 
https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"Failure to Social Distance: Breaking Gathering Limits in Titan's Lakes"


Alex Rosenthal , University of Virginia - Department of Physics
[Host: Stefan Baessler]
ABSTRACT:

Saturn's moon Titan is a geologically and meteorologically active world seen as a potential location for the development of life. While we cannot immediately answer "Is there life on TItan?" or even "Are there life-forming reactions occurring?" we can take a step back and investigate a more foundational question: "What chemistries are occurring?" The answers to this question are stepping stones to understanding broader processes such as weather cycles, geology, and potentially organic reactions. We attack this question using molecular dynamics simulations. By identifying molecules that cluster or exhibit other interesting behaviors, we hope to identify possible sites for interesting chemical reactions that could produce large or prebiotic molecules, as well as characterize those reactions.

Colloquium
Friday, February 18, 2022
3:30 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008

Attend virtually via Zoom: 
https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"Coordinate Space Representation and Average Radius of Quark and Gluon Generalized Parton Distribution Functions"


Zaki Panjsheeri , University of Virginia - Department of Physics
[Host: Stefan Baessler]
ABSTRACT:

The task of the field of nuclear physics called femtography is to image the internal structure of strongly interacting particles, from single protons and neutrons to atomic nuclei. Protons and neutrons are composed of quarks and gluons, but the precise spatial arrangement of the two valence up quarks and one valence down quark, along with the sea quarks and gluons that contribute half of the momentum, remains unknown.  A compelling method for deriving dynamical information about the internal structure of the proton is through the use of generalized parton distributions (GPDs).  Two-dimensional Fourier transforms of GPDs provide insight into matter, charge, and radial distributions of the quarks and gluons inside the nucleon.  We present an explicit calculation of such transforms in a spectator model framework using parametric analytic forms of GPDs, originally constrained using deeply virtual Compton scattering and lattice QCD data.  We compare the valence quarks to the gluon distribution through, i.a., average radii, a notion of distance inside the nucleon, and we present a novel result for the radius of the gluon density.

Colloquium
Friday, February 18, 2022
3:50 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008
Note special time.

Attend virtually via Zoom: 
https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp
 


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"Property Tuning of Layered Materials by Electrochemical Intercalation"


Dawn Ford , University of Virginia - Department of Physics
[Host: Stefan Baessler]
ABSTRACT:

Recent developments in two-dimensional (2D) magnetism have intensified the research on novel van-der Waals magnetic materials to explore new magnetic phenomena in the 2D limit. Among 2D magnetic materials, one model system is metal thiophosphates MPX3 (M = transition metal ions, X = chalcogen ions) in which the antiferromagnetic (AFM) properties are highly dependent on the choice of transition metal M. The van der Waals-type crystal structure allows the mechanical exfoliation of bulk crystals to obtain atomically thin layers. In MPX3, the AFM ordering is found to persist down to the atomically thin limit, making them a promising candidate for future device applications. Furthermore, the layered structure also permits the inter-layer intercalation, which is an effective way to tune the properties. With this motivation, we performed Li and Fe intercalation in NiPS3 by using electrochemical technique. In this method, the electrical potential causes electrons to flow from anode to cathode through the circuit within the battery leading to the intercalation of intercalant ions between the layers of the host sample as shown in figure below. By tuning the amount of charges intercalated during electrochemical intercalation, the number of intercalated ions in the host single crystal can be controlled. NiPS3 exhibits AFM ordering below TN = 155 K and the spin-flop transition above μ0H ≈ 6 T. The goal of this project is to intercalate different Li and Fe content in NiPS3 single crystals and characterize their magnetic properties. Mainly, we will focus on the tuning of the ordering temperature and the spin-flop field of pristine NiPS3. In addition, the transition from AFM state to other states such as ferromagnetism is also one important direction of this project. Li intercalation was found to increase the magnetization value of NiPS3.  Future work will consist of characterizing the changes in the magnetic ordering of Fe intercalated NiPS3 and extending the investigation of Li intercalated NiPS3.

Colloquium
Friday, February 18, 2022
4:10 PM
Ridley Hall, Room G008
Note special time.

Attend virtually via Zoom: 
https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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"Artificial Intelligence in Spin Physics"


Dustin Keller , University of Virginia - Department of Physics
[Host: Despina Louca]
ABSTRACT:

The landscape of physics research is changing due to the rapid advancement in computing. Traditionally, science is done through observation and experimentation.  While there is no indication yet that this trend will change overnight, there is an increasing likelihood that methods in physics are changing in a way that we must prepare for. New technology, new methods, and new instrumentation must be brought to the forefront to take advantage of the rapid evolution of artificial intelligence and its ubiquitous pervasiveness in all aspects of research and life.  I briefly review some of the advancement in machine learning and how these developments are changing our field using examples in Spin Physics from the recent past, the present, and near the future.

VIDEO:
Colloquium
Friday, January 28, 2022
3:30 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
Note special room.

Attend virtually via Zoom: 
https://web.phys.virginia.edu/Private/Covid-19/colloquium.asp


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To add a speaker, send an email to dn2ep@Virginia.EDU Include the seminar type (e.g. Colloquia), date, name of the speaker, title of talk, and an abstract (if available). [Please send a copy of the email to phys-speakers@Virginia.EDU.]