High Energy Physics Seminars

Special HEP seminar


Thursday, November 5, 2020
4:00 PM
Online, Room via Zoom
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Note special room.

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"TBA"


Shammi Tahura , University of Virginia - Department of Physics
[Host: Kent Yagi]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

High Energy
Wednesday, March 4, 2020
4:00 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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ABSTRACT:

The Muon-to-Electron-Conversion (Mu2e) Experiment is a high-precision, intensity-frontier experiment being developed at Fermilab which will search for coherent, neutrino-less muon to electron conversion in the presence of an atomic nucleus. Such a process would exhibit charged lepton flavor violation (CLFV), which has not yet been observed. Continuing the search for CLFV, Mu2e will improve the sensitivity by four orders of magnitude over the present limits. In the search for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics, Mu2e is uniquely sensitive to a wide range of models by indirectly probing mass scales up to the energy scale of 104 TeV. While muon-to-electron-conversion is permissible through neutrino oscillations in an extension of the standard model, the rate is extremely low at about one event in 1054. By design, the background for the experiment will be well-understood and kept at a sub-event level, which results in the observation of muon-to-electron conversion as direct confirmation of BSM physics. The largest background comes from processes initiated by cosmic-ray muons, which will produce approximately one CLFV-like event per day. In order to reduce this rate to less than one event over the lifetime of the experiment a large and highly efficient cosmic ray veto (CRV) detector is needed. The CRV will cover the experimental apparatus with an area of approximately 330 m2. The overall efficiency must be no les than 99.99%, a requirement that must be maintained in the presence of intense backgrounds produced by proton and muon beams. The detector employs long scintillator strips with embedded wavelength shifting fibers, read out using silicon photomultipliers. Key features of the talk involve the design, fabrication, and performance of the CRV, along with an overview of the Mu2e experiment.

Special Seminar


Monday, January 27, 2020
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
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"Precision timing with the CMS MIP timing detector and search for new particle production at the LHC "


Matt Joyce , University of Virginia - Department of Physics
[Host: Brad Cox]
ABSTRACT:

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is undergoing an extensive Phase II upgrade program to prepare for the challenging conditions of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). In particular, a new timing layer will measure minimum ionizing particles (MIPs) with a time resolution of ~30ps and hermetic coverage up to a pseudo-rapidity of |η|=3. This MIP Timing Detector (MTD) will consist of a central barrel region based on LYSO:Ce crystals read out with SiPMs and two end-caps instrumented with radiation-tolerant Low Gain Avalanche Diodes. The precision time information from the MTD will reduce the effects of the high levels of pile-up expected at the HL-LHC and will bring new and unique capabilities to the CMS detector. The time information assigned to each track will enable the use of 4D reconstruction algorithms and will further discriminate interaction vertices within the same bunch crossing to recover the track purity of vertices in current LHC conditions.  We present motivations for precision timing at the HL-LHC and the ongoing MTD R&D targeting enhanced timing performance and radiation tolerance for the barrel layer components.  We will also describe the progress of our search for new physics in final states with two photons and missing transverse energy using the full Run2 dataset.  

Special High Energy Seminar


Thursday, November 14, 2019
4:00 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
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 Slideshow (PDF)
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"Light in the Dark-Opening a new window to the Dark Sector "


Ruth Pottgen , Lund University
[Host: Craig Dukes]
ABSTRACT:

The origin and observed abundance of Dark Matter in the Universe can be explained elegantly by the thermal freeze-out mechanism, leading to a preferred mass range of the Dark Matter particles in the MeV-TeV region. The GeV-TeV mass range is being explored intensely by the variety of experiments searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles. The sub-GeV region, however, in which the masses of most of the building blocks of stable matter lie, is hardly being tested experimentally to date.
This mass range occurs naturally in Hidden Sector Dark Matter models. The Light Dark Matter eXperiment (LDMX) is a planned electron-beam fixed-target experiment, that has unique potential to conclusively test models for such light Dark Matter in the MeV to GeV range. This presentation will give an overview of the theoretical motivation, the main experimental challenges and how they are addressed as well as projected sensitivities.

SLIDESHOW:
High Energy
Wednesday, November 6, 2019
4:00 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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"Searching for Dark Matter from the Lowest to the Highest Energies "


Bjoern Penning , Brandeis University
[Host: Bob Hirosky]
ABSTRACT:

Dark Matter (DM) is a long standing puzzle in fundamental physics and goal of a diverse research program.  In underground experiments we search for DM directly using lowest possible energy thresholds, at collider we seek to produce dark matter at the very highest energies, and with telescopes we look for telltale signatures in the cosmos. All these detection methods probe different parts of the possible parameter space. I will highlight status of existing and upcoming experiments including new direct detection experiments with world leading sensitivities to start data taking in early 2020. Finally  we’ll discuss how to connect these approaches and how an interdisciplinary program bridging experimental frontiers can provide the most stringent constraints.

 

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To add a speaker, send an email to ecd3m@Virginia.EDU Include the seminar type (e.g. High Energy Physics Seminars), date, name of the speaker, title of talk, and an abstract (if available). [Please send a copy of the email to phys-speakers@Virginia.EDU.]